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Healthy Sleeping Habits for Your College Students

1: Take Naps

If you have the time during the day, a short nap can do wonders for your energy levels. Just make sure not to nap too close to bedtime or for too long, and a nap will do your body good.

 

2: Don’t Work in Bed

Working in bed can make getting to sleep harder. Keep your work space separate from your sleep space to keep insomnia at bay.

 

3: Stick to a Schedule

With different classes and work hours each day, it can be hard to stick to a schedule. Keeping sleep times similar from day to day can greatly improve your chances of getting a good night’s sleep.

 

4: Avoid All Nighters

While you may feel like you need to study all night to do well you’re doing yourself a disservice. Not getting enough sleep can impair your ability to do well, regardless of how much you’ve studied, so make sure you get at least a little sleep before your big test.

 

5: Create a Routine

If you have trouble falling asleep at night you can help yourself by creating a routine that will let your mind and body know that bedtime is approaching and that it should get into sleep mode. After a few weeks of practice this should help you fall asleep when you need to.

 

6: Avoid Caffeine

Avoid caffeine, eating and drinking right before bed. All of these activities can throw off your body’s internal clock, so try to limit meals, alcohol and caffeine consumption to a few hours before bed.

 

Other helpful sleeping tips:

Keep your room dark and quiet. While college campuses are hardly either, try to keep your room as dark, quiet and cool as possible. This will help trigger to your body that it’s time for bed and help you get and stay asleep.

Work out bedtimes with roommates. When sharing a room with someone it can be hard to go to bed when you need to and not get woken up when you don’t want to. Try to work with your roomies to make sure you each get the sleep you need.

Get a full night’s rest whenever possible. While the amount of sleep each person needs varies, most people need 7-9 hours to feel fully rested. While this may not be possible every night, try to sleep a full night whenever you get the chance.

 

*Information found at: https://healthservices.camden.rutgers.edu/topics_wellness

 

 

Categories: IRG News & stuff
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Posted on October 4, 2017

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    Healthy Sleeping Habits for Your College Students

    1: Take Naps

    If you have the time during the day, a short nap can do wonders for your energy levels. Just make sure not to nap too close to bedtime or for too long, and a nap will do your body good.

     

    2: Don’t Work in Bed

    Working in bed can make getting to sleep harder. Keep your work space separate from your sleep space to keep insomnia at bay.

     

    3: Stick to a Schedule

    With different classes and work hours each day, it can be hard to stick to a schedule. Keeping sleep times similar from day to day can greatly improve your chances of getting a good night’s sleep.

     

    4: Avoid All Nighters

    While you may feel like you need to study all night to do well you’re doing yourself a disservice. Not getting enough sleep can impair your ability to do well, regardless of how much you’ve studied, so make sure you get at least a little sleep before your big test.

     

    5: Create a Routine

    If you have trouble falling asleep at night you can help yourself by creating a routine that will let your mind and body know that bedtime is approaching and that it should get into sleep mode. After a few weeks of practice this should help you fall asleep when you need to.

     

    6: Avoid Caffeine

    Avoid caffeine, eating and drinking right before bed. All of these activities can throw off your body’s internal clock, so try to limit meals, alcohol and caffeine consumption to a few hours before bed.

     

    Other helpful sleeping tips:

    Keep your room dark and quiet. While college campuses are hardly either, try to keep your room as dark, quiet and cool as possible. This will help trigger to your body that it’s time for bed and help you get and stay asleep.

    Work out bedtimes with roommates. When sharing a room with someone it can be hard to go to bed when you need to and not get woken up when you don’t want to. Try to work with your roomies to make sure you each get the sleep you need.

    Get a full night’s rest whenever possible. While the amount of sleep each person needs varies, most people need 7-9 hours to feel fully rested. While this may not be possible every night, try to sleep a full night whenever you get the chance.

     

    *Information found at: https://healthservices.camden.rutgers.edu/topics_wellness

     

     

    Categories: IRG News & stuff
    Tagged In:
    Posted on October 4, 2017

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      Physical Therapist Tips

      WHAT IS PHYSICAL THERAPY? Physical Therapy (PT) is the treatment of disorders with physical agents and methods such as therapeutic exercises, mobilization, electrical and light modalities to assist in rehabilitating pati …

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