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How to Prevent The Risk of Falling in Cold Weather

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Perhaps the adage, ‘an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure’ is so popular because it’s true. The best time to get prepared for winter is long before it arrives. Senior care experts recommend these preventive safety tips to prevent falls:

Maintain your exercise habits as the weather starts getting colder. It’s hard to stay motivated to exercise when you’re homebound. But lots of indoor exercises can keep you fit when you can’t venture out. Stand at a counter and do knee-bends, or practice balancing on one leg (always near something you can grab if necessary). March in place, or stand up from a couch, sit down and stand again to help keep legs strong. Consult with a doctor or exercise specialist to help you develop a more complete indoor exercise program.

If you feel fatigued stay at home. Getting out can help cure the winter blues, but know and don’t push your limits. Going out when you’re not at your best is putting yourself at risk for a dangerous fall. Consider utilizing delivery services from pharmacies or grocery stores.

Have a safety plan. Carry a cell phone or other alert device so you can get help quickly in the event of a fall. Don’t use assistive devices without practicing at home. Rely on others. Let them know where you are, and ask yourself, “If I fell here, what would I do?” This will remove some of the panic that might set in if you do fall. Make sure outdoor light bulbs are working before winter starts. Consider adding some additional light sources outside your home. Hire someone ahead of time to shovel snow and salt your sidewalks.

Wear the right clothing. You might be used to getting dressed up for church and other favorite activities, but in the winter, stick to rubber-soled shoes with a non-skid surface. Bundle up but make sure you can move easily and see in all directions. Do some light stretching before you venture out; it will make you physically more able to prevent a fall.

Don’t assume anything. Blacktop may look just wet, but cold weather causes black ice to form fast. Don’t be tempted to think you can make a quick trip to the mailbox in your indoor shoes. Sometimes grassy areas can be less slick than road surfaces.

Look for products that could keep you safe. You can find ideas by visiting websites, at orthopedic stores and through your visiting nurse or physician. Shoe chains are an example. These products fit on the bottom of shoes, adding traction for walking outdoors in snow and ice.

Unfortunately some studies indicate that falls among seniors are on the rise. Keeping all these tips and information in mind can help prevent you from being among those senior adults who sustain an injury by falling in winter.

– See more at ComfortKeepers.com 

Categories: Injuries
Tagged In: Winter, aid, elderly, fall, healing, holidays, ice, injury, physical therapy, prevention, rehabilitation, season, senior, slips, snow
Posted on December 5, 2016

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How to Prevent The Risk of Falling in Cold Weather

walk-932965_1920

Perhaps the adage, ‘an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure’ is so popular because it’s true. The best time to get prepared for winter is long before it arrives. Senior care experts recommend these preventive safety tips to prevent falls:

Maintain your exercise habits as the weather starts getting colder. It’s hard to stay motivated to exercise when you’re homebound. But lots of indoor exercises can keep you fit when you can’t venture out. Stand at a counter and do knee-bends, or practice balancing on one leg (always near something you can grab if necessary). March in place, or stand up from a couch, sit down and stand again to help keep legs strong. Consult with a doctor or exercise specialist to help you develop a more complete indoor exercise program.

If you feel fatigued stay at home. Getting out can help cure the winter blues, but know and don’t push your limits. Going out when you’re not at your best is putting yourself at risk for a dangerous fall. Consider utilizing delivery services from pharmacies or grocery stores.

Have a safety plan. Carry a cell phone or other alert device so you can get help quickly in the event of a fall. Don’t use assistive devices without practicing at home. Rely on others. Let them know where you are, and ask yourself, “If I fell here, what would I do?” This will remove some of the panic that might set in if you do fall. Make sure outdoor light bulbs are working before winter starts. Consider adding some additional light sources outside your home. Hire someone ahead of time to shovel snow and salt your sidewalks.

Wear the right clothing. You might be used to getting dressed up for church and other favorite activities, but in the winter, stick to rubber-soled shoes with a non-skid surface. Bundle up but make sure you can move easily and see in all directions. Do some light stretching before you venture out; it will make you physically more able to prevent a fall.

Don’t assume anything. Blacktop may look just wet, but cold weather causes black ice to form fast. Don’t be tempted to think you can make a quick trip to the mailbox in your indoor shoes. Sometimes grassy areas can be less slick than road surfaces.

Look for products that could keep you safe. You can find ideas by visiting websites, at orthopedic stores and through your visiting nurse or physician. Shoe chains are an example. These products fit on the bottom of shoes, adding traction for walking outdoors in snow and ice.

Unfortunately some studies indicate that falls among seniors are on the rise. Keeping all these tips and information in mind can help prevent you from being among those senior adults who sustain an injury by falling in winter.

– See more at ComfortKeepers.com 

Categories: Injuries
Tagged In: Winter, aid, elderly, fall, healing, holidays, ice, injury, physical therapy, prevention, rehabilitation, season, senior, slips, snow
Posted on December 5, 2016

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