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Positive Changes for a Positive 2017

At the beginning of each year, people across the world set resolutions and goals. Whether it be to work out more, eat healthier, or spend more time with family, goals can be hard to achieve. Especially when they’re lofty ones that include changing lifestyle habits. Rose McAvoy, a Lynnwood-based weight loss lifestyle coach has some steps to get you headed in the right direction, and to stay on track.

To start off, determine how you want to feel when you reach your goal. “A common mistake in goal setting is to focus entirely on the doing or having of a thing. The real success of a goal lies in how you will feel, not only at the finish, but with each victory along the way.” Thinking only of the end goal can make small setbacks harder, remembering why you initially set the goal, and all the steps you have already taken to reach it can help.

Goals shouldn’t be too easy to reach. “Achieving a goal should take you on a journey of growth. When you set your goal, aim for a gut feeling of about 50 percent. ‘What if I can’t do this?’ and 50 percent ‘What if I can?'” Leaving the comfort zone can be hard, but will be worth it! With each new milestone reached, you’re one step closer. With steps come progress. It might help to break down your goal to smaller goals, that way it seems easier to achieve. “When I set my goal [run 276.6 miles in a year] I calculated what it would take to finish my running goal in a year: 1.78 miles per run with 3 runs per week. At the time, I didn’t believe I could run 276.6 miles but I absolutely knew I could run 1.78 miles.”

From the start to the end, it is important to track your progress. ” I tracked my running goal with a Google spreadsheet. After each run, I logged the distance. The spreadsheet displayed weekly totals, averages, the distance covered, and the distance remaining. Watching those numbers change was hugely motivating. Even on days when I didn’t want to run, I could convince myself to do the minimum because I knew every effort made a measurable change to my tracking sheet.”

So with McAvoy’ advice in hand, get started on those resolutions! Happy New Years from all of us at IRG.

For more info on Rose McAvoy, click here. Quote taken from her article in the herald, “Five Steps Toward Positive Change”.

 

Categories: IRG News & stuff, Wellness
Tagged In: New years, Rose McAvoy, everett herald, goals, health, lynnwood, marathons, mileage, physical therapy, progress, resolutions, running, weight loss, wellness
Posted on January 3, 2017

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Positive Changes for a Positive 2017

At the beginning of each year, people across the world set resolutions and goals. Whether it be to work out more, eat healthier, or spend more time with family, goals can be hard to achieve. Especially when they’re lofty ones that include changing lifestyle habits. Rose McAvoy, a Lynnwood-based weight loss lifestyle coach has some steps to get you headed in the right direction, and to stay on track.

To start off, determine how you want to feel when you reach your goal. “A common mistake in goal setting is to focus entirely on the doing or having of a thing. The real success of a goal lies in how you will feel, not only at the finish, but with each victory along the way.” Thinking only of the end goal can make small setbacks harder, remembering why you initially set the goal, and all the steps you have already taken to reach it can help.

Goals shouldn’t be too easy to reach. “Achieving a goal should take you on a journey of growth. When you set your goal, aim for a gut feeling of about 50 percent. ‘What if I can’t do this?’ and 50 percent ‘What if I can?'” Leaving the comfort zone can be hard, but will be worth it! With each new milestone reached, you’re one step closer. With steps come progress. It might help to break down your goal to smaller goals, that way it seems easier to achieve. “When I set my goal [run 276.6 miles in a year] I calculated what it would take to finish my running goal in a year: 1.78 miles per run with 3 runs per week. At the time, I didn’t believe I could run 276.6 miles but I absolutely knew I could run 1.78 miles.”

From the start to the end, it is important to track your progress. ” I tracked my running goal with a Google spreadsheet. After each run, I logged the distance. The spreadsheet displayed weekly totals, averages, the distance covered, and the distance remaining. Watching those numbers change was hugely motivating. Even on days when I didn’t want to run, I could convince myself to do the minimum because I knew every effort made a measurable change to my tracking sheet.”

So with McAvoy’ advice in hand, get started on those resolutions! Happy New Years from all of us at IRG.

For more info on Rose McAvoy, click here. Quote taken from her article in the herald, “Five Steps Toward Positive Change”.

 

Categories: IRG News & stuff, Wellness
Tagged In: New years, Rose McAvoy, everett herald, goals, health, lynnwood, marathons, mileage, physical therapy, progress, resolutions, running, weight loss, wellness
Posted on January 3, 2017

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Here is a quick reference guide featuring a variety of Costco’s snack bar & shake options. Print ‘Costco Cheat Sheet’ here.

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